Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 26, 2010

Web Deploy 1.1 has shipped!

Microsoft is happy to announce that we just shipped an update to our RTW 1.0 bits with a set of bug fixes that have been reported on the forums and through the feedback channels.

What’s new:

You can get the new bits at at the extension page, http://www.iis.net/webdeploymenttool and in the Web Platform Installer.

 

Web Deploy Summary

Here’s a summary about what the Web Deploy is all about:

After 2 years of development and lots of customer feedback, Microsoft announced the Web Deployment Tool.

In version 1.0, we have the following components:

  • Powerful APIs that allow you to deploy, sync and migrate web applications on IIS, and perform granular operations like changing IP bindings, site names and changing file structures on the fly. You can also create a new provider to sync a new type of resource.
  • Command-line tool (msdeploy.exe) that allows you to perform all the same operations available in the APIs.
  • User interface built into IIS Manager 7.0 on Vista, Windows 2008 and Windows 7 that allows you to create packages (zip files containing IIS config, content, databases and more) and install them.
  • Delegation framework and service built into IIS 7.0 that allows you to delegate tasks like installing applications and databases without requiring them to be administrators on the box.
  • Remote administrative service that works on IIS 6.0 and 7.0 to allow server-level synchronization by administrators.

So, what can you do with these components?

  • Migrate Web applications from IIS 6.0. Simplify the planning of your IIS 6.0 to IIS 7.0 migrations by determining incompatibilities and previewing the proposed changes before starting the process. Learning about any potential issues in advance gives you the chance to take corrective measures and simplifies migration.
  • Synchronize your server farm. Synchronize between IIS 6.0 > IIS 6.0 or IIS 7.0, and only sync the differences. The tool simplifies the synchronization process by automatically determining the configuration, content and certificates to be synchronized for a Web site. Optionally, specify additional resources for sync, including databases, COM objects, GAC assemblies and registry settings.
  • Package, archive and deploy Web applications. Package configuration and content of Web applications, including databases, and then use the packages for storage or redeployment. These packages can be deployed using IIS Manager without requiring administrative privileges. The tool integrates with Visual Studio 2010 to help developers streamline the deployment of Web applications to the Web server. The tool also integrates with the Web Platform Installer to allow you to simply and easily install community web applications.

What are some of the new features in RTW?

  • Brand new UI to create those server-side delegation rules, instead of directly editing config.
  • Delete and recycle application support inside IIS Manager, even as a remote non-admin user.
  • A new temporary agent that doesn’t require you to have any services installed on your remote machines, but instead temporarily adds the agent and then removes it after sync.
  • A rule to avoid overwriting newer files on the destination with a new rule.
  • A rule to avoid syncing based on time stamp differences and instead perform a checksum comparison.
  • A new provider (runCommand) allows you to run a batch file, script or exe as part of synchronization. This is convenient if you need to net start a service, for example.
  • Lots of enhancements to our parameterization, including the ability to validate what the user enters, and provide a parameters.xml file with answers to parameters instead of passing them one at a time in the command-line.

Some of our favorite scenarios include:

  • Create application packages that contain all of the IIS config, content, databases and more, including parameters so that when the server admin installs the package, they are prompted to fill in parameters like SQL Server connection string.
  • Insert a few XML files into your existing application zip file (such as DotNetNuke or WordPress) and make your application work seamlessly in control panels or through the Web Platform installer.
  • Build an automated deployment system using our APIs, cmd-line or the Visual Studio integration, so that you can deploy daily from test to staging to production.
  • Allow your developers to directly deploy to the staging server without admin intervention, and lock down exactly what they can change (mark a folder as an app but not change the site’s binding).
  • Replace Application Center with a set of scripts or programs that call our APIs or cmd-line to sync multiple servers in a web farm.
  • Build a roll-back solution by taking a package of your live app, deploying the app_v2 package created in your dev environment, and checking for failures. In case of failures, automatically apply the v1 package or backup that you took.

You can get the 1.0 release at http://www.iis.net/webdeploymenttool

If you haven’t tried it yet, it’s worth checking out. Web Deploy is very powerful for delivering your applications.

Thanks to Faith Allington and the rest of the Web Deployment team for great content on the Web Deploy Team Blog.

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
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Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 24, 2010

Internet Explorer 9 – All you can eat!

image

I have had  lot of enterprises and software development companies (ISV’s) asking about Internet Explorer 9 lately.

So I thought I would create a good list of resources.

If you want to get up to speed on IE9, I suggest you the IE keynote and the other sessions from MIX listed below.

Internet Explorer 9: Platforms Demos <- Get a copy of the preview and run the demos
http://ie.microsoft.com/testdrive/

Mix10:IE9 Keynote Day 2 with Dean Hachamovitch. IE9 Preview Demos
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/KEY02

Mix10: In-Depth Look at Internet Explorer 9
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/CL28

Mix10: Advanced Web Debugging with Fiddler. Eric Lawrence
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/FT50

Mix10: The Tale of JavaScript. I Mean ECMAScript. Douglas Crockford
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/EX39

Mix10: How jQuery Makes Hard Things Simple
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/EX36

Mix10: Internet Explorer Developer Tools.  John Seitel
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/FT51

Mix10: HTML5: Cross-Browser Best Practices
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/CL27

Mix10: HTML5: High Performance Best Practices for Web Sites
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/CL29

SVG: The Past, Present and Future of Vector Graphics for the Web
http://live.visitmix.com/MIX10/Sessions/EX30

IEBLOG: HTML5, Hardware Accelerated: First IE9 Platform Preview Available for Developers
http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/03/16/html5-hardware-accelerated-first-ie9-platform-preview-available-for-developers.aspx

IEBLOG: More Standards Documentation Available
http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/03/17/more-standards-documentation-available.aspx

IEBLOG: The New Javascript Engine in Internet Explorer 9
http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/03/18/the-new-javascript-engine-in-internet-explorer-9.aspx

IEBLOG: SVG in IE 9 Roadmap
http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/03/18/svg-in-ie9-roadmap.aspx

IEBLOG: The CSS Corder: About CSS Corners
http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/03/19/the-css-corner-about-css-corners.aspx

IEBLOG: The Internet Explorer Testcenter Welcome page: Clarification & Corrections
http://blogs.msdn.com/ie/archive/2010/03/19/the-internet-explorer-testcenter-welcome-page-clarification-corrections.aspx

IEBLOG: Introducing the IE9 Developer Platform Preview
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/Introducing-the-IE9-Developer-Platform-Preview/

IEBLOG: IE 9 and SVG – Past, Present a…of Vector Graphics for the Web
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/In-your-hands-IE9-and-SVG-Past-Present-and-Future-of-Vector-Graphics-for-the-Web/

CHANNEL9: IE9 at MIX10
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/Internet-Explorer-9-at-MIX10/

CHANNEL9: First look at the new JS Engine
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/IE-9-First-look-at-the-new-JS-Engine/

CHANNEL9: IE 9 – Surf on Metal with GPU Powered HTML5
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/In-your-hands-IE-9-Surfing-on-Metal-GPU-Powered-HTML5/

CHANNEL9: IE 9 Performance Pipeline Overview
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/In-your-hands-IE-9-Performance-From-JS-to-COM-to-DOM-to-HTML5-on-GPU/

CHANNEL9: IE 9: Surfing on the GPU with D2D
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/IE-9-Surfing-on-the-GPU-with-D2D/

CHANNEL9: IE 9: Standards and Interoperability
http://channel9.msdn.com/posts/Charles/IE-9-Standards-and-Interoperability/

Let me know if I missed any smile_regular

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
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Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 24, 2010

Download the Internet Explorer 9 Platform Preview

tsDownloadTheInternet

The Internet Explorer 9 Platform Preview is here!

Download the Internet Explorer 9 Platform Preview NOW! 

Check out the new capabilities of the next Internet Explorer, with the Internet Explorer 9 Platform Preview.

Find demos of HTML5 and the hardware-accelerated performance with background compiled JavaScript.

There are 3 great groups of demos on the Test Drive site

image image image

You can also download the Windows Internet Explorer Platform Preview user guide and release notes.

You can also find the following key test results (SunSpider, ACID3, CSS3, and IE Testing Center)

image  imageimage image

Very exciting stuff!

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
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Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 23, 2010

SharePoint 2010 Licensing Explained

image

Lots of questions lately from partners and customers about SharePoint 2010 licensing. So here’s an overview of what each version contain:

SharePoint Foundation Server 2010  is the free offering replacing WSS 3.0. and will have the usual limits of SQL Express and Search Express.

The Standard  SharePoint functions will be base around Collaboration, Enterprise Search, Document and Content Management, Social Computing (Wikis, My Sites), Digital Asset Management (including Silverlight) and Records Management. Standard edition is basically all unstructured data.

The Enterprise  functionality is a long list:

  • Excel Services
  • Performance Point Services
  • Advanced Charting
  • Visio Services
  • Access Services
  • InfoPath Form Services
  • Client line of business integration and web parts
  • Custom Reports

In addition, server licenses can be upgraded to use FAST search.

With FAST, the server licenses break into Standard and Enterprise as before but this time there are both intranet and internet versions. Added to this is the aforementioned FAST server license which comes in both flavors too. So when you add this to the Foundation Server you have a total of seven types of SharePoint.

Note that the SharePoint for Internet 2010 Standard Edition is designed for small to medium concerns and will retail at about half the price of the current MOSS for internet. It will be artificially throttled around content size.

For intranet solutions the Client Access Model remains with the need to buy both a Standard  and Enterprise CAL  to access Enterprise features. For FAST although the license upgrade is for the server users utilizing it will need an  Enterprise CAL.

SharePoint 2010 Online for intranet will continue with the current User Subscription License based on Enterprise, Standard and Desk-less (read and form filling only). It will also have an Internet and Partner Access versions. Partner Access is effectively an extranet option.

Here’s some more related technologies:

SharePoint Workspace (the app formerly known as Groove) comes with Office 2010 PRO+ (which sounds like a caffeine tablet)

Office Web AppsOffice 2010 but do need SharePoint Foundation 2010  to work.

Project Server 2010 – needs a Project CAL  and a SharePoint Enterprise CAL

SQL Server Power Pivot  – SQL Enterprise Edition  if exposed only in office then an Office 2010 to be surfaced in SharePoint an Enterprise CAL  is required.

Just for completeness there is also a non-SharePoint version of FAST Fast Search Server 2010 for Internet Business.

Thanks to Coline Napier for most of this content. He had a great post around SharePoint 2010 Licensing.

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
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Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 22, 2010

MIX10 – jQuery JavaScript Library

Here’s a brief overview, key messages and rude Q&A from the Microsoft’s announcement about the jQuery JavaScript Library during the 2nd Day keynote of MIX10 in Las Vegas last week (Tuesday 16 March 2010).

If you are interested in watching the actual MIX10 keynote, you can check it out here: http://live.visitmix.com/

 

Overview

Microsoft is a supporter of the jQuery JavaScript Library. Currently, Microsoft is shipping it with Visual Studio and ASP.NET MVC. Microsoft also builds features making it easier for ASP.NET developers to create rich standards-based web application using the jQuery JavaScript Library. At MIX10, Microsoft is announcing it will take a more active role participating in the open-source, community-driven development of the jQuery JavaScript Library. Microsoft will work in concert with the jQuery JavaScript Library team to accelerate the creation of new features designed to simplify and expedite the creation of rich-web applications on any platform. Microsoft’s latest deliverable to the community creating the jQuery JavaScript Library is to propose a powerful templating feature that makes it easier for developers to build client-side, data-driven web applications.

Key Messages

  • Microsoft is pleased to announce it is expanding its long-standing support of the jQuery JavaScript Library.
  • Microsoft will now help make the jQuery JavaScript Library a primary way to develop rich JavaScript based client-side internet applications. Going forward, Microsoft is contributing its own developer resources to accelerate the progression of the jQuery JavaScript Library for the benefit of the standards-based Web.
  • Microsoft’s expanded relationship with the the jQuery JavaScript Library community further demonstrates our cross-company focus on embracing Web standards, supporting open source communities, and simplifying and enriching how developers build Web solutions.

Rude Q&A for The jQuery JavaScript Library

Q: Is Microsoft trying to overtake the jQuery JavaScript Library effort in an attempt to stifle the project?

A: No. Microsoft is adopting the open source approach to development that the jQuery JavaScript Library community uses for its contributions to the jQuery JavaScript Library. This means that the jQuery JavaScript Library community will be able to provide direct feedback and contribute to the Microsoft work being done for the jQuery JavaScript Library. In addition, the final decision regarding, and control over, Microsoft’s submissions lays in the hands of the jQuery JavaScript Library team.

Q: Is Microsoft planning to use the jQuery JavaScript Library as another means to driving licensing and patent revenue? How will you license customers for the IP provided by Microsoft developers to the jQuery library?

A: Microsoft is adopting the open source approach to development used by the jQuery JavaScript Library community, meaning the community can provide direct feedback and contribute to the materials Microsoft developers contribute to the jQuery JavaScript Library. The jQuery Foundation will redistribute works provided under its licensing model.

Q: Does Microsoft stand to make any money of its deepened relationship with the jQuery Foundation? Is Microsoft providing financial support to the jQuery Foundation as part of this agreement?

A: No. Microsoft’s contribution is driven by our desire to better enable Web developers to use the library of their choice. Microsoft is a strong supporter of the jQuery JavaScript Library community, and by donating to the jQuery JavaScript Library we are better enabling developers to be successful building web solutions.

Q: Why aren’t you working with the CodePlex Foundation?

A: Microsoft is working with the CodePlex Foundation. Microsoft continues to work with the CodePlex Foundation which is a home for the very popular Ajax Control Toolkit and Orchard products. The community is actively contributing to these projects and an update is planned for the Ajax Control Toolkit as early as April 2010.

Q: If you are already working with the CodePlex Foundation on similar items you plan to submit to the jQuery library, why not submit them via the CodePlex Foundation?

A: Microsoft is already working on a similar project with the CodePlex Foundation. From Microsoft’s perspective, this contribution was driven solely by the intention to better enable Web developers to use the library of their choice (whether it be code created by the CodePlex Foundation or the jQuery Foundation) and improve interoperability between open source and Microsoft software.

Q: Can you quantify the number of developer, test and program management resources you are now dedicating to support the jQuery JavaScript Library? Any well-known names (e.g., will Scott be directly involved)?

A: No. Microsoft is still in the early stages of its donation to the jQuery JavaScript Library and it will take a few weeks before we have details on the number of resources and other aspects.

Q: Will this mean fewer resources for other Microsoft projects?

A: No. Microsoft is actively working on all its projects. We also expect that other projects such as the Ajax Control Toolkit will remain active and vibrant. For example, updates and enhancements are planned for the Ajax Control Toolkit as early as April 2010.

Q: What will happen to the ASP.NET Ajax Library? Are you killing it off?

A: The ASP.NET Ajax Library and the Ajax Control Toolkit are part of the CodePlex Foundation’s ASP.NET Open Source Gallery. The future of these projects is decided by the CodePlex Foundation and its community.

Q: What will happen to ASP.NET Ajax? Are you killing it off?

A: ASP.NET Ajax is part of the Microsoft .NET Framework 4 release. Developers can use it independently or in combination with either the Ajax Control Toolkit from the CodePlex Foundation or the jQuery JavaScript Library from the jQuery Foundation.

Q: What will happen to the Ajax Control Toolkit?

A: The Ajax Control Toolkit (ACT) is part of the ASP.NET Open Source Gallery in the CodePlex Foundation. To date, there are over a million software developers using the ACT. Further ACT enhancements and bug fixes are coming with an update planned as early as April 2010.

Q: What are some of the features Microsoft is adding to the jQuery JavaScript Library?

A: Microsoft offers extensive experience in creating rich client-side script libraries. Microsoft will begin to contribute implementations of our popular template concepts to the jQuery JavaScript Library. To view the current state and progress of our contributions, please visit: http://wiki.github.com/nje/jquery/jquery-templates-proposal and http://github.com/nje/jquery-tmpl.

Q: Will jQuery be available as a part of Microsoft products?

A: It already is. For the benefit of developers, the jQuery JavaScript Library 1.4.1 is shipping with Microsoft Visual Studio and ASP.NET MVC. Additionally the jQuery JavaScript Library 1.4.1 is available directly on Microsoft’s Content Delivery Network.

Q: What is the call to action for developers? What are you releasing and when?

A: We encourage developers to review and feedback on some of the work we’ve already developed with the jQuery JavaScript Library community, particularly our work around templates (available at http://wiki.github.com/nje/jquery/jquery-templates-proposal.) Going forward, developers both looking to build rich client-side applications and comfortable working directly with the JavaScript Library can use jQuery going forward. Developers interested in using server controls with ASP.NET Web Forms from Microsoft, or developers who are currently using the AJAX Control Toolkit from the CodePlex Foundation can continue working with those resources.

Q: Why is Microsoft making this contribution?

A: Today, both Microsoft and the jQuery Foundation offer powerful client-side libraries that work well on any server technology. Many of the features Microsoft delivers complement the jQuery JavaScript Library’s client-side offerings. In addition, developers frequently use a combination of both libraries when building rich client-side applications. To make development even easier, Microsoft will now use its own developer resources to contribute to the jQuery Foundation and further add to the already powerful jQuery JavaScript Library. This will provide all Web developers, including those not using ASP.NET, with a single, powerful client-side library with which to build rich Web applications.

Q: What are the benefits of Microsoft’s contributions to the jQuery community?

A: Microsoft has a long history of JavaScript development. Microsoft invented the XMLHttpRequest API, which provides the foundation for all Ajax-based Web applications on the internet. Over the past few years, Microsoft worked on advanced client-side JavaScript libraries such as the Ajax Control Toolkit (ACT) and the ASP.NET Ajax Library that allowed any Web developer, regardless platform, to build richer, faster Web applications. With this announcement, Microsoft brings considerable expertise and specialist knowledge to the jQuery JavaScript Library and can help accelerate the development of that library, as well as benefit the community that uses it. In addition, Microsoft will be adopting the open source approach to development that the jQuery Foundation uses for its contributions to the jQuery JavaScript Library, meaning the community will be able to provide direct feedback and contribute to the Microsoft work being done for the jQuery JavaScript Library.

Rude Q&A for ORCHARD

Q: What is Orchard? Are you announcing anything today?

A: "The Orchard Project" is a CodePlex Foundation technology focused on delivering a .NET-based Content Management System (CMS) application for developers to rapidly create content-driven Web sites. The Orchard Project will also deliver an extensibility framework allowing developers and customizers to provide additional functionality to the CMS through extensions and themes. For more information, attend the “Deep Dive into Orchard Extensibility for CMS Developers” session, which is presented by Renaud Paquay on Wednesday, March 16th at 1:30 p.m. in Mandalay Ballroom D.

Here’s some other useful links info you want to find out more:

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
Find me on Facebook Find me on Twitter Find me on LinkedIn Find me on Channel9 Chat via Live Messenger Chat via Office Communicator
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Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 22, 2010

FREE AppDev eLearning Events – Coming Soon

There’s some great FREE training events coming up from AppDev. They are worth checking out if the topics are of interest.

"What’s New in ASP.NET MVC 2: MVC Matures" with Don Kiely
Wednesday, March 24th from 1pm – 2:30 pm CST (Free)  Register Now

"Exploring Visual Studio 2010 ALM Tools" with Chris Menegay
Wednesday, April 7th from 11am – 12:30 pm CST (Free)  Register Now

"Content Management in SharePoint Server 2010" with Doug Ware
Wednesday, April 21st from 11am – 12:30 pm CST (Free)  Register Now

"Introduction to the Entity Framework 4.0" with Robert Green
Wednesday, May 5th from 11am – 12:30 pm CST (Free)  Register Now

"Introduction to Binding in Silverlight" with Ken Getz
Wednesday, May 19th from 11am – 12:30 pm CST (Free)  Register Now

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
Find me on Facebook Find me on Twitter Find me on LinkedIn Find me on Channel9 Chat via Live Messenger Chat via Office Communicator
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blog US ISV Team Blog

Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 10, 2010

Windows Phone 7 Backward Compatibility

The big question from all the software developers I work with has been “What is the developer experience moving forward with Windows Phone?”

phones[1]

Bottomline: What is the Windows Phone 7 Backward Compatibility story?

Here’s a link that describes what most of the articles out there have stated:

http://www.redmondpie.com/windows-mobile-7-hands-on-incompatible-with-legacy-apps-9140356/

Based on all those articles, one would realistically conclude that an app written for WM7 will only run on WM7, and apps written for prior versions of Windows Mobile will also not run on WM7.

Charlie Kindel recently wrote about this on his blog:

http://blogs.msdn.com/ckindel/archive/2010/03/04/different-means-better-with-the-new-windows-phone-developer-experience.aspx

His short answer was Yes.

Here’s some the relevant bits from the post:

“For us, the cost of going from good to great is a clean break from the past. To enable the fantastic user experiences you’ve seen in the Windows Phone 7 Series demos so far we’ve had to break from the past. To deliver what developers expect in the developer platform we’ve had to change how phone apps were written. One result of this is previous Windows mobile applications will not run on Windows Phone 7 Series.”

“To be clear, we will continue to work with our partners to deliver new devices based on Windows Mobile 6.5 and will support those products for many years to come, so it’s not as though one line ends as soon as the other begins.”

“The expertise and familiarity with our tools is not lost. If you are a .NET developer today your skills and much of your code will move forward. If you are Silverlight or XNA developer today you’re gonna be really happy. New developers to the platform will find a cohesive, well designed API set with super productive tools.”

Great post from Charlie and great content around the backward compatibility story for Windows Phone 7.

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
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Posted by: Murray Gordon | March 9, 2010

Silverlight Testing Tools

Tim Heuer’s got a great blog post on Silverlight testing tools at http://timheuer.com/blog/archive/2009/02/26/silverlight-testing-frameworks.aspx.

He’s provides a quick overview of 3 different options:

Definitely worth checking out!

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
Find me on Facebook Find me on Twitter Find me on LinkedIn Find me on Channel9 Chat via Live Messenger Chat via Office Communicator
blog MurrayGordon.com
blog US ISV Team Blog

Posted by: Murray Gordon | February 26, 2010

GetUpToSpeed on Visual Studio 2010 & .NET 4.0

I have had so many questions lately on how to get up to speed quickly on Visual Studio 2010 & .NET Framework 4.0.

So here’s my GetUpToSpeed how-to for Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4.0.

In order to get the most out of Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4, I recommend you do the following:

image1) Review the Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Learning Courses from Microsoft on Channel 9 – The Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Learning Course. This course includes videos and hands-on-labs designed to help you learn how to utilize the Visual Studio 2010 features and a variety of framework technologies including: C# 4.0, Visual Basic 10, F#, Parallel Computing Platform, WCF, WF, WPF, ASP.NET AJAX 4.0, ASP.NET MVC Dynamic Data.

2) Download and consume the Visual Studio 2010 and .NET Framework 4 Developer Training Kit

image3) Download Visual Studio 2010

10-44) Watch the 10-4 show on Channel 9 featuring the Subject Matter Experts who bring to you Metro for Visual Studio. There are 41 episodes to date and they are stellar. You can subscribe to the show and get the episodes in the media type that works best for you.

Subscribe:

5) Download any other parts of the Visual Studio 2010 Release Candidate you might want to check out

image 

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
Find me on Facebook Find me on Twitter Find me on LinkedIn Find me on Channel9 Chat via Live Messenger Chat via Office Communicator
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Posted by: Murray Gordon | February 26, 2010

Get started with Microsoft Test Manager

I been getting a lot of questions lately about the testing story for Visual Studio 2010. Here’s a little summary and resources to get you started.

Products that include Testing features

Three products provide testing functionality in Visual Studio 2010:

  • Visual Studio Test Professional: This is primarily for the generalist tester who wants to create manual test cases, run these tests and view the results as part of a test plan. This SKU includes the new application called Microsoft Test Manager. This SKU can be installed quickly and easily on the test machine where the tester wants to run their tests. You can also run automated tests from Microsoft Test Manager if an automated test is associated with a test case using functionality in one of the following two SKUs.
    • NOTE – Visual Studio 2010 is not provided as part of the Test Professional.
  • Visual Studio 2010 Premium: This provides the features to enable a user to create unit tests and UI automated tests for an application. The tests that are created can be run from Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, the command line, Team Foundation Build, or be associated with a test case and run from a test plan using Microsoft Test Manager.
    • NOTE – Microsoft Test Manager is not part of the Visual Studio 2010 Premium SKU.
  • Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate: This contains all the test functionality provided for Visual Studio 2010. It includes Microsoft Test Manager providing the functionality for planning, creating, and running test cases. It also enables you to create and run unit tests, UI automated tests, load tests and Web performance tests, generic tests and ordered tests using Microsoft Visual Studio 2010. These automated tests can be run from Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, the command line, Team Foundation Build, or be associated with a test case and run from a test plan using Microsoft Test Manager.
    • NOTE – If you want to run load tests and simulate multiple users, you must also purchase virtual user license packs.

Full Story on Testing

Here’s the link to get the full story on testing http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182409(VS.100).aspx

Opening Microsoft Test Manager

Here’s a screenshot of how to start Microsoft Test Manager, if you are running VS2010 Ultimate:

clip_image002

 

Thanks for checking out this post!

Cheers,
MurraySignature

Murray Gordon
ISV Architect Evangelist
Microsoft Corporation
 
Find me on Facebook Find me on Twitter Find me on LinkedIn Find me on Channel9 Chat via Live Messenger Chat via Office Communicator
blog My Blog @ MSDN
blog MurrayGordon.com
blog US ISV Team Blog

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